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Math

List of Google Now voice commands

Google Now can do tons of great stuff using nothing but voice commands. The list is more longer than you might think!

Source: List of Google Now voice commands

 

Google Now isn’t new but the feature is getting more rich all the time. That’s because it’s learning.

The learning computer has been the dream and destination since Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace worked together on their invention the Analytical Engine computational device which is the first ancestor to the modern computer. Even in the early infancy the two debated voraciously if the device they invented which only performed the computations they programmed, could one day learn on it’s own and be interacted as though it were not a machine.

Alan Turing knew of this philosophical debate and created a test known as the Turing test which consisted of three questions for being able to tell the difference between a response of a human being from that of a computer. Turing is an incredible man worth study and recently the topic of the movie “The Imitation Game” which chronicled his work on the Enigma machine which he designed to crack the cipher being used by the German’s in World War II. He was able to foresee the power of computers and knew how easily they could be programmed to deceive as much as find truths.

This fantasy which seems like it’s part of a science-fiction novel is incredibly real. Jarvis from Iron Man is here and it’s call Google Now. Apple came out with Siri a few years back and people had a lot of fun at parties showing off the tricks they’d learned to make Siri perform.

Google Now is backed by the Google search algorithms which makes it a little different. Unlike Apple who’s core business is hardware, Google’s core business is about knowing you. They are inventing artificial intelligence that does a better job of demonstrating empathy than an actual human being is capable of doing. Coupled with Moore’s law, the Google AI is expected to be smarter than the smartest man in just a few years. Meaning we indeed will no longer be able to tell the difference between a computer that needed us to program them, and one that does not.

So Google Now may seem like a novelty, and for now it’s function is limited to that which the programmers allow. Rest assured, while we’re “playing” and “trying” Google is learning and their destination is clear. They are making the technology we really need; the technology that doesn’t need us.

Can a computer really think on it’s own? Or are some problems only built for the human brain, no matter how much computational brute force you can throw at it?

Categories: Business, Computers, Crowdsource, Economics, Linguistics, Math, Privacy, Technology

Blow my mind

BOLD: Peter Diamandis

Source: BOLD: Peter Diamandis

This is the book where I encountered exponential thinking.

What is exponential thinking?

Well… It isn’t linear thinking. It doesn’t seek the solve the next increment one user at a time.

Exponential thinking is about creating wealth and abundance by harnessing rapidly expanding technology to solve a problem plaguing a continent or better, the entire planet.

This book gives some great prescriptive advice about navigating this golden age we’re experiencing today. It covers topics like the Internet of things and crowd-sourcing seed investment for your idea.

The opportunities are ever present for anyone creative who can synthesize and converge seemingly unrelated concepts.

Go big or go home as they say.

Categories: Business, Computers, Crowdsource, Management, Math, Philosophy, Technology

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Vsauce

Vsauce

Source: Vsauce – YouTube

This is another great channel everyone should know about. Michael Stevens tackles the most mind bending topics in an entertaining and digestible way.

I enjoyed his channel so much I gobbled up almost every video in one sitting.

I’m a nerd.

Categories: Computers, Linguistics, Math, Philosophy

Blow my mind

National Institute of Standards and Technology

National Institute of Standards and Technology

Source: National Institute of Standards and Technology

This is the site you’ll want to use when making any authoritative argument in life. The people who make the stuff that makes our world work (like the internet and electricity) all take their marching orders here.

It’s a deep, deep dive but well worth it. You might not ever get through it all, but it’s nice to know the reference is there when you need it.

Don’t say I didn’t warn you and have fun!

Categories: Business, Computers, Math

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How did the NSA hack our emails?

Yeah… ya know… modular arithmetic.

Well it was in NIST white papers all along, how did you miss it?

NIST.Gov is a really good read. If you read it more you would have known how easy it was to read everyone’s email wouldn’t you?

What else are we missing under our noses? I’ll read Nist now and let you know.

Categories: Computers, Cryptography, Math, Security

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Numberphile

Videos about numbers – it’s that simple. Videos by Brady Haran

Source: Numberphile – YouTube

Numberphile and it’s sister channel’s Computerphile, Sixty Symbols, Bibledex, Periodic Videos among several others are the product of prolific youtube producer Brady Haran. I believe Numberphile is the one of the first fully youtube funded video channels due to extremely high educational value.

These videos are so great and exactly what I wish the rest of internet content creators would be doing. Using the internet for the betterment of humanity instead of hate mongering. Apparently 99% of all internet content is darknet filth.

There’s some other really great channels on youtube, thinking of you Vsauce and Ted Talks. I’m really enjoying the golden age we’re living in where knowledge is shared so readily.

If you have any other great sites you’d like to share please be a darling and leave a link in the comments below.

 

Categories: Math

Blow my mind

Love and Math – by Edward Frenkel

Math and it’s intrinsic beauty shouldn’t just be digestible to everyone, it should feasted upon with your friends like the bunch of hipster instagramming foodies you know you are.

At least that’s what Edward Frenkel says in a much more articulate and elegant way in his book Love and Math. He also appears on Youtube videos with Numberphile and talks all over the world bringing the Gospel of numbers to the masses.

Math appears everywhere in nature and that’s what we love using it to explain our universe by applying number theories to Physics and Chemistry.

The beauty if Math is that it’s self-evident. (with a bunch of explaining) But the truths uncovered by Archimedes and Euclid still hold true to this day. Math students today being initiated into Geometry still study the same puzzles and proofs from 2000 years ago.

Edward Frenkel has personally inspired me to revisit math and I’ve taken it further than I ever thought I would.

It’s actually very enjoyable and entertaining to just sit back and be amazed instead of the brow beating practicing proofs most of experienced in our High School Algebra and Geo-trig courses.

If that’s the experience you recall I urge you to head over to the Numberphile channel and let Edward and all the experts show you the artistry you missed back in school.

Warning: you will be thinking about math when you’re trying to sleep.

A New York Times bestseller. Winner of the Euler Book Prize. Currently being translated into 14 languages. (I’m not the guy getting the book signed)

Source: Love and Math – by Edward Frenkel

Categories: Math, Philosophy

Blow my mind

You are a Simulation & Physics Can Prove It: George Smoot at TEDxSalford

This is the stuff that really hurts. I didn’t want a sliver of doubt George. And then you said you’d plant one, and did. How am I supposed to go about my day knowing that we are in “The Matrix”?

At least I get to be the hero of my own story line. That’s not so bad I guess?

This isn’t the first time I’ve heard some wacko talk about “The Matrix” being real. I just thought they had always taken one too many red pills from Morpheus.

But George Smoot is a Nobel Prize winner and wouldn’t waste anyone’s time if he didn’t believe in it somewhat. That lends a bit of credibility right?

George doesn’t talk about this but there’s been a lot of other stuff said on the topic. I recall from an episode of Through the Wormhole (I’ll try to find a link) that talked about bombarding a carbon molecule with electrons and you get a perfect predictable pattern shooting out the other side. Since carbon is the most common building block of life it’s plausible that element is just a mathematical unit that is most easy to manipulate. This would be useful for something like I dunno, creating an automated computer generated simulation of the universe?

I think I also saw something similar from Edward Frenkel in his book Love and Math. He describes the “double slit” experiments in which he observed electronics passing through the slits will stack themselves up perfectly uniform fashion which demonstrated a deterministic characteristic of matter.

Due to the previously understood to be erratic behavior of electrons, this was a very unexpected result. But once observed seems like would have been the obvious result to a child watching sand in an hourglass.

In other words, the more we understand about the universe makes the randomness appear… not random at all. As if it programmed that way.

Mind blown?

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Categories: Computers, Linguistics, Math, Philosophy

Blow my mind

The Zipf Mystery

Let’s start here.

Mysterious, elegant and somewhat disturbing. Why? (why do I do this to myself? is the real question)

Can anyone explain this? We’re really just living in a simulation aren’t we?

Do you have any other mind blowing mysterious elegant facts of the universe? I want to know. Lay it on me and blow my mind.

 

Categories: Computers, Linguistics, Math, Philosophy

Blow my mind